Restore Filthy Antique Wood and Furniture Fast and Simple

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http://www.thedoityourselfworld.com/articles/article.php?id=6 This article shows you how to very easily restore a nice, new luster to filthy old antique wood items and furniture.

As long as your wood has not peeling lamination, broken pieces or missing edges, this is all you need to make your wood look like new. It blends in old scratches and dings and cleans the wood nicely.

31 thoughts on “Restore Filthy Antique Wood and Furniture Fast and Simple

  1. I realize this video is about six years old but I just happened upon it..…..Nice job cleaning that dart board case up! The oil cleaned it up, but preserved the vintage look, while also protecting it……..I love Old English Lemon Oil, which I'm assuming is the same thing as Old English Furniture Polish (it shows "lemon" at the bottom in your video). The label used to be mostly black with "lemon oil furniture polish in the center bottom.

    That's what my bottle of lemon oil looks like that I've had for many, many years. It's finally on the last drops (I have no idea how long ago we bought it). I just used it on a 1950s dresser made by American of Martinsville that's been in my family since 1969….we just refurbished it by replacing the veneer top. I used the lemon oil on the front and sides, not the top yet since I had only just stained it. I put furniture paste finishing wax on it for now, but I'm going to try a new bottle of Old English furniture polish (lemon) to see if it's the same thing…to maintain it and the matching tall (high boy) dresser. >^..^<

  2. Thanks for this tip. I was prepared to use a harsher method which Ive done in the past. But I think I will do this and see how it goes. I think at the very least its going to help me preserve and protect the very old desk I have. So, thank you!

  3. I have restored many pieces of furniture and never used this stuff. I normally clean with soap allow to dry. Then 00/01 steel wool and little bit of thinners/ turps, this creates a smoother surface. again with 000 steel wool with a bit thinners/turps until you have a very smooth surface. Then use wax or oil , teak,linseed,orange,lemon.then with a soft linnet free cloth begin to polish in the figure 8 until you have the required finish. A bit work, but the result is worth it. Regarding this video, for a quickie it is okay.

  4. IM NOT FILTHY THE GOVERNMENT ARE THE PIGS THAT HAVE WRITTEN THE CRAP IVE NOT READ THEIR EVIL CORRUPT HYPOCRITICAL BULLYS WHAT TYPE OF EVIL HYPOCRITES ARE THE AUTHORS OF A BOOK IVE NOT READ THEN BULLY A POOR DEFENCELESS WOMAN EVIL CORRUPT AUTHORITY BEING HYPOCRITICAL BULLYS WHAT A SURPRISE NOT

  5. You can also mix 3 parts white spirit with 1 part methylated spirit and 1 part linseed oil together and use that as a wipe. Or just 4 parts white spirit and 1 part linseed oil.

  6. Sorry, but all this has done is broken down & diluted the crap that was on there enabling it to sink further into the grain, the only difference if afraid is a thinner solution of muck & grime

  7. Thanks for the video!! I was raised using Old English. My Mom should've done commercials for it.  I just recently (I was in a pinch) started using a vinegar/olive oil combo. It works fantastic and it's cheap!! Not that O.E. is pricey but, there's a better chance that I have vinegar and olive oil in my cabinet. And, it's also great on salad!! lol Keep up the good work DIYW !

  8. There is still some of the old finish or varnish on that piece. That is where the oil didn't soak in right away. Maybe it's just me, but I'd think about removing that to make the finish even.

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